New & Notable

Here is a synopsis of news items I found of interest, plus a couple of book suggestions you might enjoy.

In case you missed the announcement, The Chase Hotel is under contract to be sold to Boston-based Hospitality Properties Trust for $94 million. Read more in an article by reporter Jacob Barker in Thursday’s St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “The complex boasts 350 hotel rooms, about 50 corporate apartments, close to 90 condominiums, meeting rooms, restaurants, bars and a movie theater complex.”

Nicki's Central West End Guide Art & Architecture Events, Sightings Food and Drink Shop News  Up-Down The Chase Hotel NY Times reporter Diane Cardwell Martin Schweig Margaret Atwood Emily Robbins   There was a full house for Thursday night’s meeting at Mary Ann’s Tearoom for those interested in hearing more about Up-Down, an arcade bar which is slated to open at 405 N. Euclid, in the former Herbie’s location.

Up-Down business owner, Josh Ivey, and general manager, Joey Akers, gave a power-point presentation about their other locations in Kansas City and Minneapolis and what they hope to bring to the CWE. Ivey described Up-Down as an entertainment destination for those who wax nostalgic for 80’s & 90’s arcade games. The arcade bar will serve craft beers and have limited food service. pizza, salads, etc.

There were many questions and comments from neighbors- both pro and con – about whether this business is a good fit for that location. The Up-Down owner is seeking signatures in support of a liquor license application to determine whether the business is a “go.”

I LOVED reading Diane Cardwell’s article titled Solar Experiment Lets Neighbors Trade Energy Among Themselves in the March 13 issue of the NY Times. Will what works in Brooklyn work in the CWE, or for that matter, any neighborhood in the City of St. Louis?

What I’ve been reading: Author Emily Robbins, who graduated from the writers’ program at Washington University, was at Left Bank Books recently to discuss her first novel, A Word for Love. It’s a beautifully-written story of language, war, family, and love, set in a Middle Eastern country (Robbins lived in Syria for a time). Also, I just finished the fascinating A Handmade’s Tale by Margaret Atwood, who was named by Saint Louis University Library Associates as recipient of its 2017 St. Louis Literary Award in a ceremony scheduled for September. Both books are available at Left Bank Books.

And finally, my dear friend, and friend to many, Martin Schweig, died Thursday at age 94. My favorite photograph of Martin, a photographer, naturalist, bird whisperer, and longtime CWE resident and business owner (Martin Schweig Gallery, Ferrario ) is shown below taken when he rescued a barred owl that had fallen through a chimney on Westmoreland Place.

I consulted Martin frequently about photography and birds, see example here. In addition he shared photographs from his archives from time to time which I loved posting, look here. If you use the search tool on the sidebar, you’ll find many more references to Martin.

Nicki's Central West End Guide Art & Architecture Events, Sightings Food and Drink Shop News  Up-Down The Chase Hotel NY Times reporter Diane Cardwell Martin Schweig Margaret Atwood Emily Robbins   Nicki's Central West End Guide Art & Architecture Events, Sightings Food and Drink Shop News  Up-Down The Chase Hotel NY Times reporter Diane Cardwell Martin Schweig Margaret Atwood Emily Robbins

Juno Bridal opens in CWE

Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End

What an unexpected treat it was to stumble upon a simply stunning bridal salon at 4430 Olive Street, east of Taylor Avenue. Juno Bridal, named after the Roman goddess of marriage, celebrated its grand opening on Saturday, March 4.

Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End

Last summer Claire Ketterer left Los Angeles where she had been practicing nursing for the previous 3 years, and returned to St. Louis and her large tight-knit family in North County. While she was away she would hear news of her parents, 2 sisters, 3 brothers and 2 step-siblings and “always felt left out.”

She gave up nursing – at least for the time being – and decided to try something completely different. She saw that St. Louis was lacking a boutique bridal salon and searched the city and county for a suitable location to fill the void. She looked in The Grove (which she loves) and Kirkwood, for example, but fell in love with a a light-filled storefront at 4430 Olive Street, which she said, “is just the right size, and out of the bustle of the CWE retail district. It also has lots of street parking.”

Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End   Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End

On the website Juno Bridal is described as:

“…not your mother’s bridal shop. We’re for the free-spirited, creative, modern bride who cherishes individual style.”

Ketterer carries 6 designers whose creations are unconventional and exclusive to Juno Bridal. The gowns range in price from $1,500 to $3,000, which Ketterer says are on the more affordable side of gowns found in boutique settings. Most of the designers are based in the U.S. and Canada. One is located in Budapest.

There will be frequent trunk shows (Truvelle is scheduled for March 24 to 26), and that designer’s wedding gowns will be 10% off at that time.

Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End   Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End   Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End

Brides-to-be are advised to make an appointment at least 8 months before the wedding date so there is ample time to choose the dress, have it made, and shipped. If you need a dress sooner, Ketterer will do the best she can to make it happen, though you may have to pay a rush fee. Alterations are not offered on premises, though there a list of reputable seamstresses on hand.

Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End   Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End   Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End   Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End

Juno Bridal is the only salon in St. Louis to offer Bohemian-style dresses such as the one above designed by Daughters of Simone, based in San Francisco.

Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End   Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End   Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End   Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End   Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End

A selection of bridal veils and flower crowns are also on display, above and below.

Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End   Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End   Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End   Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End   Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End   Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End

Ketterer’s cousin Mary Kohnen creates the flower crowns for the shop, some of which are shown above.

Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End   Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End   Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End   Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End   Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End   Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End   Nicki's Central West End Guide Services Shop News  Truville wedding gowns St. Louis MO Juno Bridal Daughters of Simone Claire Koetterer Central West End

A family photo at the grand opening shows from left, cousins Laura and Anna Kohnen, Claire Ketterer, middle, and her sisters Sara and Caroline, far right.

The whole family pitched in to help get Juno Bridal open. Claire says her father, who owns his own business, was tremendously helpful guiding her through the process of setting up Juno Bridal. Two brothers are electricians and took care of all the lighting needs, and her sister Sara, who works for Butler’s Pantry, brought all the food for the grand opening. She mentioned that her stepmom was a big help too.

Juno Bridal is open every day but Monday by appointment, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., (314) 300-8959. It’s suggested that appointments be booked online (you should check out the lovely website whether wedding plans are in your future or not). The shop is another wonderful addition to the growing mix of new retail establishments springing up in the neighborhood.

A timely discussion for 1st CWE Ideas Event: The future of public radio

Nicki's Central West End Guide Art & Architecture Books, Dance, Music, Theater Events, Sightings  Tim Eby St. Louis Public Radio Selkirk Auctioneers & Appraisers PRX John Barth General Manager CWE Ideas Thought Salon Corporation for Public Broadcasting Chief Content Officer

The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (the largest source of funding for public radio, television, and related online & mobile services) is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, though the term “celebrating” is a bit of a stretch since funding for CPB, created by Congress in 1967, is on the new administration’s chopping block. A headline from yesterday’s Wall Street Journal reflects the concern of public radio affiliates: Station operators fear President Donald Trump is targeting the CPB, which doles out money to nearly 1,500 stations. 

As fans of St. Louis Public Radio, CWE Ideas founders Eric Hamblett and I thought a conversation about how public radio is funded would be a compelling topic to launch our 1st Thought Salon. Last Thursday, Chief Content Officer of PRX (Public Radio Exchange) CWEnder John Barth, above left, and St. Louis Public Radio’s General Manager Tim Eby, above right, offered food for thought at Selkirk Auctioneers & Appraisers, 4739 McPherson Ave.  Selkirk’s Director Sarah Cunningham and Consignment Representative Bryan Laughlin generously offered to host the event against a backdrop of Indian artifacts, masks, and Oriental rugs that were in place for the March Auction scheduled for last weekend.

Keeping Public Broadcast Alive, What You Need to Know, What You Can Do, attracted approximately 36 people, including several who had worked for public radio in different parts of the country. Since Barth and Eby have known each other for years, the conversation was relaxed and extremely informative.

Most of us were surprised to learn that CPB is “a private, nonprofit corporation created by Congress in the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967. It’s the steward of the federal government’s investment in public broadcasting and the largest single source of funding for public radio, television, and related online and mobile services. CPB’s mission is to ensure universal access to non-commercial, high-quality content and telecommunications services. It does so by distributing more than 70% of its funding to nearly 1,500 locally owned public radio and television stations.”

Public radio stations are privately owned (St. Louis Public Radio is owned by UMSL), and each station takes on the flavor of its location. Barth reminded the audience that many parts of the U.S. do not have internet access, so public radio is the go-to source for news.

An audience member who had worked for public radio in West Texas said that each public radio  station also reflects the interests of its listeners. So programming in West Texas is much different than it is in St. Louis, for instance. Another attendee mentioned that she noticed a big difference when she moved from Omaha to St. Louis – St. Louis Public Radio is much more conservative than public radio in Omaha.

John Barth added that there is a perception that public radio leans liberal when in fact it is compelled to report the news objectively. Tim Eby said that each station has its own ombudsman, who represents the listener and is charged with making certain the station stays objective.

In a nutshell, here are

Nicki's Central West End Guide Art & Architecture Books, Dance, Music, Theater Events, Sightings  Tim Eby St. Louis Public Radio Selkirk Auctioneers & Appraisers PRX John Barth General Manager CWE Ideas Thought Salon Corporation for Public Broadcasting Chief Content Officer   Nicki's Central West End Guide Art & Architecture Books, Dance, Music, Theater Events, Sightings  Tim Eby St. Louis Public Radio Selkirk Auctioneers & Appraisers PRX John Barth General Manager CWE Ideas Thought Salon Corporation for Public Broadcasting Chief Content Officer

Nicki's Central West End Guide Art & Architecture Books, Dance, Music, Theater Events, Sightings  Tim Eby St. Louis Public Radio Selkirk Auctioneers & Appraisers PRX John Barth General Manager CWE Ideas Thought Salon Corporation for Public Broadcasting Chief Content Officer   Nicki's Central West End Guide Art & Architecture Books, Dance, Music, Theater Events, Sightings  Tim Eby St. Louis Public Radio Selkirk Auctioneers & Appraisers PRX John Barth General Manager CWE Ideas Thought Salon Corporation for Public Broadcasting Chief Content Officer   Nicki's Central West End Guide Art & Architecture Books, Dance, Music, Theater Events, Sightings  Tim Eby St. Louis Public Radio Selkirk Auctioneers & Appraisers PRX John Barth General Manager CWE Ideas Thought Salon Corporation for Public Broadcasting Chief Content Officer

Here’s where funding comes from:
Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), which is funded 2 years in advance to protect it from politics in Washington. So proposed budget cuts won’t necessarily make a difference immediately, though West Virginia Public Radio is already seeing signs that it may have to cut employees, due to possible budget cuts in the state legislature. This just in: West Virginia governor proposes restoring funds for West Virginia Public Radio.
Foundations (Knight, MacArthur, Ford etc)
Underwriting
Major gifts/individuals
Pledges (YOU!) (fund drives, such as the Spring Fund Drive that just ended on St. Louis Public Radio)
State support: Missouri’s Governor Greitens just cut funding to public universities (UMSL), which effects St. Louis Public Radio.
Earned revenue (from special events)

One of the younger attendees mentioned that more and more of her friends are asking where they can find real news. She tells them public radio. 

If you are so inclined, here is a list of Congressmen you can contact to help protect funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

  • Senator Roy Blunt (MO): Chair of Appropriations Subcommittee (HHS & Labor)
  • Senator Mike Enzi (WY): Chair of Senate Budget Committee
  • Senator Thad Cochran (MS): Chair of Senate Appropriations Committee
  • Senator Patrick Leahy (VT): Vice Chairman of Senate Appropriations Committee
  • Congressman Jason Smith (MO 8th District): Member House Ways & Means Committee

At a time when more and more people are listening to public radio and viewership of PBS News Hour has risen dramatically, it’s important that we all do what we can to help. Though the Spring Member Campaign has ended, it’s never too late to make a contribution to St. Louis Public Radio. Here is a link to make it easy (consider a sustaining membership).

Tim Eby said at the close of the q & a portion of the evening:

“We need more of this type of (civilized) discussion in this country.”

We couldn’t agree more. Eric and I are working on our next event(s) which will be announced soon. In the meantime, if there are any topics you would like to learn more about, please email us (eric@techartista.org, or nickisbuzz@gmail.com) and we’ll try to make it happen.